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Curious
The light bulb icon represents curiosity. For content about raising a curious child, look for this icon.

Inside High Five October 2017

CHECK OUT HIGH FIVE’S SUPER-FUN, READ-ALOUD STORY “Green, Yellow, and Red”

Highlights 4Cs

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Curious
The light bulb icon represents curiosity. For content about raising a curious child, look for this icon.
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Creative
The paint brush icon represents creativity. For content about raising a creative child, look for this icon.
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Caring
The holding hands icon represents caring. For content about raising a caring child, look for this icon.
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Confident
The thumbs up icon represents confidence. For content about raising a confident child, look for this icon.
This colorful, dual-language tale is the perfect autumn choice for your future bilingual star. Trust us on this one: the benefits of learning a foreign language are huge!
CHECK OUT HIGH FIVE’S SUPER-FUN, READ-ALOUD STORY

Looking for a smart way to keep your curious little cutie stimulated as autumn approaches? Read “Green, Yellow, and Red” on pages 20–23 of the October 2017 issue of High Five™. Let the fun begin!

Here’s the Story

Juan Toucan and Bebo Bear enjoy a fall walk through New York City. They notice the changing leaves, the colorful foods at the market, and the bright traffic lights, all of which have something in common—the colors verdes (green), amarillas (yellow), and rojas (red)!

Extend the Fun
1. Chat about the feature
  • Go for a walk with your eager learner. Ask your child if your stroll is similar to the one Juan and Bebo take together. How is it different?
  • Mention that Juan and Bebo see the same three colors over and over throughout the story. Wander around town and find those colors, too.
  • Ask your child to name his own favorite autumn colors—and which fall activities he likes best.         
2. Practice Spanish
  • Repeat the Spanish words together each time you read the story.
  • Let your child use her rapidly expanding vocabulary often—including when you read the story.
  • Label items around the house. Use the Spanish words for red, green, and yellow.
  • Encourage your child to use a simple Spanish word, such as mira, in a sentence she usually says in English. Teach her to say, “Mira, there’s Grandma” or “Mira, a puppy!” Do this with other phrases, too.
3. Use newly acquired knowledge
  • Look up Spanish words for your child’s favorite colors.
  • Read a picture book together and point out any signs of the seasons and colors in the story.
  • Create leaf art. Grab a fallen leaf, a sheet of paper, and a crayon, and do a rubbing. Go crazy with colors!
4. Talk about feelings
  • Focus on friendship. Ask your child the following: Do Juan and Bebo look happy as they tour New York City together? How do you know that? How do you feel when you are out and about exploring?
  • Remind your child that Juan and Bebo waited until the light turned green to cross the street. Ask your little learner about a time he had to wait, and what he did while he was waiting.
More activities to share
  • Play Red Light, Green Light. It’s a classic kid’s game and children love it. See how here.
  • Collect leaves and acorns and other autumn items.
  • Call out colors as you browse through the grocery store. Launch an in-house scavenger hunt with a list of colors for your child to find.

Tell us: What’s your take on homework? Please select the sentence below that best reflects your point of view.

Parents Talk Back
Tell us: What’s your take on homework? Please select the sentence below that best reflects your point of view.
Kids today get too much homework.
31% (15 votes)
Homework is important. Kids need to stay on task to keep up with the pack.
19% (9 votes)
Parents should be encouraged to help young kids with homework.
35% (17 votes)
Parents should encourage kids to complete homework assignments on their own.
15% (7 votes)
Total votes: 48