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Curious
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Inside Highlights August

Ask Arizona

Highlights 4Cs

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Curious
The light bulb icon represents curiosity. For content about raising a curious child, look for this icon.
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Creative
The paint brush icon represents creativity. For content about raising a creative child, look for this icon.
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Caring
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Confident
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In the August issue of Highlights, Arizona sets envy aside and a friendship emerges.
Ask Arizona
Want to help your kid get more out of reading this summer?

Take a few minutes to enjoy Ask Arizona together. It’s one of our regular columns and a kid favorite. You can find it on page 40 in the August Highlights, or visit HighlightsKids.com and listen to the recorded version. When you read the story, however, don’t dive in too quickly. Instead, explore the pictures, check out the captions, and use both as tools to help boost your child’s reasoning powers and promote understanding. In school they call this technique previewing the material, and it’s a great way to enhance comprehension, as your child learns to read for details and draw conclusions.

Recap: Jealous in New Jersey envies a neighbor’s athletic talents and asks Arizona if she’s ever felt jealous.

Arizona recalls her own reaction to a standout athlete at camp, and yes, she was envious. In fact, Arizona was not prepared to like the athlete, but Megan was so gracious and down-to-earth that a friendship developed. Arizona realized she should have spent more time getting to know Megan and less time begrudging her.

Conversation Starters:
  • Is there anyone at school who is a much better athlete or student than all the other children? Is anyone not as talented in school or sports?
  • Could you be friends with someone who’s a much better athlete or student than you are? Why or why not? Could you be friends with someone who doesn’t do as well as you in class or at sports? Explain why you feel the way you do.
  • What are some fun or interesting new sports you’ve played? What did you like about them? Is there one you would like to try as an after-school activity this year?
  • How do you feel being around a sore loser or someone who brags about winning? Can you think of a way to change the topic when someone acts this way?
  • If you could trade one of your skills, what would you give up, and what skill would you like Megan and Arizona’s machine to give you?
Reading Comprehension Boosters:
  • When almost all of Megan’s arrows landed near the bull’s-eye, she attributed it to luck. Why do you think she did that?
  • What are some of the things that Arizona and Megan have in common?
  • Why did Arizona regret spending time and energy on being jealous? What did she say she could have been doing instead?
  • Arizona said that Megan was “beyond the best” at everything. Do you think Megan would agree with that statement? Why or why not?
  • What passage in the story suggests that Megan, like Arizona, is also creative?

Thinking about your child’s school curriculum, how do you view the current quality and quantity of STEM offerings (science, technology, engineering, and math)? Please select one of the following:

Parents Talk Back
Thinking about your child’s school curriculum, how do you view the current quality and quantity of STEM offerings (science, technology, engineering, and math)? Please select one of the following:
There is not enough emphasis on science, technology, engineering, and math.
53% (18 votes)
There are an appropriate number of offerings in science, technology, engineering, and math.
21% (7 votes)
There is too much emphasis on science, technology, engineering, and math.
9% (3 votes)
Not sure.
18% (6 votes)
Total votes: 34