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Curious
The light bulb icon represents curiosity. For content about raising a curious child, look for this icon.

Inside Highlights February 2017

Dear Highlights: What Your Kids Ask Us

Highlights 4Cs

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Curious
The light bulb icon represents curiosity. For content about raising a curious child, look for this icon.
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Creative
The paint brush icon represents creativity. For content about raising a creative child, look for this icon.
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Caring
The holding hands icon represents caring. For content about raising a caring child, look for this icon.
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Confident
The thumbs up icon represents confidence. For content about raising a confident child, look for this icon.
All children need help handling new, puzzling, or challenging situations. So every month, we provide spot-on tips for kids who contact us—in writing or by email—to reveal their everyday problems.
Dear Highlights February 2017
Each month, kids across the nation write to Highlights for Children, disclosing their biggest concerns and seeking help solving day-to-day problems. Their letters are touching, amusing, thought-provoking, sometimes emotional, and always revealing. They also provide great insight into the minds of today’s young children.

For these reasons and more, you may want to take time today to read the most recent letters from Highlights kids and check out our answers. You can find them below, or on page 42 of the February 2017 issue. The hot topics right now: protecting personal space, overcoming stage fright, and dealing with a boastful sibling. Use the conversation starters that follow to help your own child learn to manage similar situations.

Kids can’t stop touching Wisconsin reader Ruby’s silky black hair, and that makes her uncomfortable. We suggested that Ruby tell her friends politely, yet firmly, to stop—and confide in an adult if the behavior continues.

Q’s for your kids:
Why might it be hard to ask a friend to stop a behavior that upsets you? What do you think it means when someone talks about his or her “personal space”? What would you say to a friend who helps herself to your fries or chips even when you ask her not to?

A teacher asked Massachusetts reader Anna if she wanted a part in a school performance; Anna agreed, but now she’s nervous about performing in front of a crowd. We assured Anna she can overcome her stage fright by having fun onstage and not worrying too much about making a mistake. Chances are the audience won’t even notice!

Q’s for your kids:
Has the fear of making a mistakeever stopped you from raising your hand in class, trying out for a part in a play, playing a sport, or learning a musical instrument? What would you tell a friend who asked for your help to overcome stage fright?

Levi from Washington loves to cook and bake but wishes his brother would stop bragging about being a better cook and baker. We mentioned that his brother may ease up if Levi doesn’t pay attention to his comments. We also encouraged teamwork: the results are often much better when you collaborate and share ideas with others.

Q’s for your kids:
People brag for a lot of reasons. For example, they may think it makes them look good or important to others. Do you think boasting about abilities is a good way to make and keep friends? How do you react when you hear a friend or classmate brag about being a great athlete or a superior student? Do you think children who brag are insecure or confident in their abilities?

A playdate heads south when your five-year-old and another child have a minor disagreement. The dispute gets heated. You:

Parents Talk Back
A playdate heads south when your five-year-old and another child have a minor disagreement. The dispute gets heated. You:
Let the kids work it out. (They’ll have to learn that skill eventually.)
27% (13 votes)
Step in to ease tension and help solve the problem.
67% (32 votes)
Chirp, “It’s snack time!”
4% (2 votes)
Vow to never invite that child for another playdate.
0% (0 votes)
End the playdate early.
2% (1 vote)
Total votes: 48