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Curious
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Inside Highlights December 2016

Ask Arizona

Highlights 4Cs

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Curious
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Creative
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Caring
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Confident
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After Arizona runs out of time to work on an art project for school, she discovers some useful time-management tips.
Ask Arizona
Fans of our monthly Ask Arizona feature know they can always count on our talented young adventurer, Arizona, to give the best advice. She takes kids seriously, weighs in wisely in response to their letters, and always provides spot-on ideas to ease worries and address their concerns.

Which is exactly what happened when writer Too Much to Do in Tucson recently confessed to having serious time-management problems—and Arizona responded in kind with a story of her own.

You can read Too Much to Do’s letter and Arizona’s response on pages 40-41 of the December issue. You also can view both online at HighlightsKids.com or read the recap here. But do make a note to check out the story; it’s one of Arizona’s most relatable columns. Then use the conversation starters and reading comprehension questions that follow to supplement the story and bolster your child’s skills.

Recap: Too Much to Do in Tucson is overwhelmed by a busy schedule and asked Arizona for help in using time more efficiently.

In response to Too Much to Do in Tucson, Arizona confessed that she, too, has had to tackle a time-management problem. Arizona revealed that she once misused time allotted for an important project, resulting in a frenzied race against the clock to turn in a school assignment on time. In fact, even after Arizona had resolved to start the project the night before the deadline, other responsibilities and temptations came up, and in the rush to complete the project, she did a less-than-spectacular job. In the end, Arizona learned a valuable lesson about time management and the importance of setting priorities. Her advice to Too Much to Do in Tucson: be sure to make a plan that maps out the priorities, and remember to complete the most important tasks first.

Conversation Starters:
  • Arizona’s brother, Tex, thought that buying a bigger clock would help their mother gain a few extra hours. Why was that amusing? Describe a time you misunderstood the meaning of a word, or came to a better understanding as you got older.
  • In this story we learned Arizona likes karate and decorating cookies. Which after-school activities do you like best? Are there activities you would like to try in the next few months?
  • If you could raise money or gather supplies for any cause or activity, what would you collect, for whom, and why?
  • Arizona’s dad called her by a nickname: ‘Zona. What are some of the nicknames that family and friends have for you? Have you ever created a nickname for a friend? Tell me the nickname and let me guess who it is.
  • Describe a project that could have had a better outcome had you had more time to complete it. How could you have done a better job?
Reading Comprehension Boosters:
  • Name three reasons Arizona started her project later than she should have.
  • What two rules does Arizona now follow to improve her time-management skills? Why do you think those tips are useful to her?
  • Describe Karate Buddies and what Arizona does as part of the program. 
  • How does Arizona’s family divide up chores—and keep track of who is responsible for them?
  • Even though Arizona had a lot to do, she still went to Ollie’s house to help Ollie and Abuela decorate cookies. Explain at least two of the reasons Arizona didn’t turn down Ollie’s request for help.

How do you reward excellence or achievement?

Parents Talk Back
How do you reward excellence or achievement?
Praise or a pat on the back.
80% (37 votes)
An inexpensive gift or toy.
9% (4 votes)
A gift of substantial value.
7% (3 votes)
We do nothing—it’s expected.
4% (2 votes)
Total votes: 46