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Curious
The light bulb icon represents curiosity. For content about raising a curious child, look for this icon.

Inside Highlights December 2016

Dear Highlights: What Your Kids Ask Us

Highlights 4Cs

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Curious
The light bulb icon represents curiosity. For content about raising a curious child, look for this icon.
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Creative
The paint brush icon represents creativity. For content about raising a creative child, look for this icon.
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Caring
The holding hands icon represents caring. For content about raising a caring child, look for this icon.
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Confident
The thumbs up icon represents confidence. For content about raising a confident child, look for this icon.
Kids who write to Highlights asking for help solving everyday problems have one big thing in common: they want guidance. They want to know what to do in sticky situations, and they want to know how to do the right thing. For us, that’s not at all surprising because our mission here at Highlights is to help all kids become their best selves. Check out the kids’ letters on page 42 of the December issue, or read the recaps and our responses here. Then set aside time to have a heart-to-heart discussion with your youngster. Use the conversation starters below.
Dear Highlights
Hot Topics This Month:
What to say to a well-meaning but distracting friend; being recognized as an individual and not as an extension of an older sib; and dealing with a desire to visit someplace far from home.

Cameron asks for help finding a polite way to tell a chatty classmate to stop distracting her. We advised her to tell her friend, in a nice way, that she should wait until after class to talk, and not to respond to her friend’s chatter during class.

Q’s for your kids:
Describe a time a friend diverted your attention from a teacher or an assignment. Did you ignore the interruption or get distracted? How did you get back on track? What types of things intrude on your concentration at home? How could you limit those distractions?

Ella is concerned her older brother’s reputation for causing trouble at school will affect teachers’ opinions of her. We told Ella most teachers would not make assumptions about her based on her big brother’s behavior, as long as Ella remains respectful and works hard.

Q’s for your kids:
What do you have to do at school to make sure you maintain a good reputation? How would you get a shady one? Do you think people judge you by the company you keep?

Ayanna has never seen snow and she yearns to build a snowman. But because she lives in the Bay Area of California, that’s not going to happen. We suggested that she speak to her parents about taking a trip to see snow and build a snowman. If that’s not possible, she can always have a winter-themed party and pretend she lives in her very own West Coast winter wonderland!

Q’s for your kids:
If you could move tomorrow, where would you like to live? Why do you want to live there? What do you like best and what do you like least about the house and town you live in now? Do you prefer warm-weather activities or things you can do when it’s cold?

How do you reward excellence or achievement?

Parents Talk Back
How do you reward excellence or achievement?
Praise or a pat on the back.
80% (37 votes)
An inexpensive gift or toy.
9% (4 votes)
A gift of substantial value.
7% (3 votes)
We do nothing—it’s expected.
4% (2 votes)
Total votes: 46