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Curious
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Inside Highlights March 2017

Dear Highlights: What Your Kids Ask Us

Highlights 4Cs

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Curious
The light bulb icon represents curiosity. For content about raising a curious child, look for this icon.
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Creative
The paint brush icon represents creativity. For content about raising a creative child, look for this icon.
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Caring
The holding hands icon represents caring. For content about raising a caring child, look for this icon.
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Confident
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What children ask about life’s challenges—and what we say to help them manage just about anything that comes up
Inside Highlights March 2017
Each month, kids write to Highlights for Children for help solving everyday problems. They talk about things that come up at home and school, and with friends and family. And we respond to their letters in our Dear Highlights feature, offering insights and suggestions to help. 

You can check out Dear Highlights on page 42 of the March 2017 issue—or read the recaps of kids’ letters and our suggestions here. Then, use the prompts that follow to jump-start a conversation. You’ll learn a lot, and you might even want to add some insights of your own.

Hot topics this month: a critical sibling, judgmental friends, and staying in touch long distance.

E-mailer Allison’s big sister taunts her about her taste in toys and movie characters. We offered Allison three ways to resolve the problem: talk it out and explain her feelings; together, learn to discuss differences in a respectful way; or simply ignore her sister’s teasing.

Q’s for your kids:
Have you ever teased, or been teased by, a friend or sibling? Why do you think people tease? Is it fun…or hurtful? If someone teases you, what can you do to stay positive? What could you do or say to make someone who is teasing you stop?

Texan Chloe misses her cousin who lives in another city. She writes to stay in touch but is looking for other ways to bridge the gap. We told Chloe that if her parents approve, she may be able to video-chat or call her cousin. Also, they could keep a two-way journal, adding entries the other could read, creating a memorable record of their friendship over time.

Q’s for your kids:
How would you rather stay in touch with someone: video-chat, write a letter, or call?Why is it sometimes better to write a letter? When might it be better to video-chat or call? Which do you prefer: snail mail or e-mail? Why?

Californian T.’s best buds say he shouldn’t be friends with another boy who they think is “weird,” but T. likes him. We told T. his friends’ opinions shouldn’t influence his decision—he is free to be friends with whomever he wants.

Q’s for your kids:
Have you ever been friends with kids who didn’t get along with each other and made you feel stuck in the middle? What did you do or say to resolve the problem? Have you ever felt left out—in the lunchroom or at recess? Have you and your friends ever left anyone out? How did it make that person feel?

Thinking about your child’s school curriculum, how do you view the current quality and quantity of STEM offerings (science, technology, engineering, and math)? Please select one of the following:

Parents Talk Back
Thinking about your child’s school curriculum, how do you view the current quality and quantity of STEM offerings (science, technology, engineering, and math)? Please select one of the following:
There is not enough emphasis on science, technology, engineering, and math.
53% (18 votes)
There are an appropriate number of offerings in science, technology, engineering, and math.
21% (7 votes)
There is too much emphasis on science, technology, engineering, and math.
9% (3 votes)
Not sure.
18% (6 votes)
Total votes: 34