x
Caring
The holding hands icon represents caring. For content about raising a caring child, look for this icon.

Inside Highlights November 2018

What’s Up with Goofus and Gallant®

Highlights 4Cs

Curious, Creative, Caring, and Confident™
x
Curious
The light bulb icon represents curiosity. For content about raising a curious child, look for this icon.
x
Creative
The paint brush icon represents creativity. For content about raising a creative child, look for this icon.
x
Caring
The holding hands icon represents caring. For content about raising a caring child, look for this icon.
x
Confident
The thumbs up icon represents confidence. For content about raising a confident child, look for this icon.
Inside Highlights November 2018: Goofus and Gallant

It’s never too early for kids to learn how to make good choices. It’s a skill kids develop over time, especially when they have good examples to follow.

And that’s exactly where Goofus and Gallant comes in. With Gallant always showing good judgment, and Goofus inevitably slipping up, your kids can learn how to make choices they’re proud of—and that you’re proud of too.

Help teach your kids how to make smart choices by checking out this month’s feature, found on page 10 of the November issue, or read the recaps below along with our accompanying conversation starters.

Recap 1: Goofus gives personal information to a stranger on the phone. Gallant doesn’t give sensitive information to people he doesn’t know.

Conversation Starters:

  1. Why do you think Gallant offered to take a message rather than give personal information to the stranger on the phone? 
  2. What is a scam? What kind of information do scammers try to trick you into giving?
  3. What are some ways you can tell if a call is from a scammer, or from someone else you don’t know and shouldn’t give information to?
  4. You should never give personal information to people you don’t know. If you ever find yourself in the same situation as Goofus, what can you do? How should Goofus have acted?
Recap 2: Goofus forces a friend to choose between him and another friend. Gallant tells a friend he can invite another friend when they play basketball.

Conversation Starters:

  1. Why do you think Gallant invited his friend’s friend to play?
  2. What are some important qualities you look for in a friend?  
  3. Do you try to make new friends? If not, how could you start?
  4. Did a friend’s attitude toward you ever change once she started hanging out with someone else? How did that make you feel?
  5. Did you let your friend know how her new behavior made you feel? What did you say—or what could you have said—to your friend?
  6. Even if someone unintentionally leaves you out, it can still be pretty hurtful. What can you do in class, at lunch, at recess, or at after-school activities to make others feel included?
  7. How can you show your friends or classmates that you care about their feelings?