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Curious
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Inside Highlights September 2016

What Your Kids Ask Us

Highlights 4Cs

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Creative
The paint brush icon represents creativity. For content about raising a creative child, look for this icon.
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Curious
The light bulb icon represents curiosity. For content about raising a curious child, look for this icon.
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Caring
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Confident
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Here’s a great way to jump-start important parent-child conversations: Check out our Dear Highlights column (with your child) and discover ways to solve everyday problems. You can find the column on page 42 of the September 2016 issue, or you can read the recaps here and then use the prompts that follow to guide discussions.
What Your Kids Ask Us
Hot topics this month:

How to solve a conflict, how to make chores enjoyable, and what to say when you feel hurt.

J. is concerned that his band constantly argues over who should be the lead singer. We advised the group to meet, air opinions, and discuss fair compromises, such as alternating the lead singer, dividing up songs, and divvying up other band-related tasks.

Q’s for your kids: Why is being the “lead” singer something bandmates might argue about? What could happen when everyone in a group airs opinions? What’s good—and not so good—about alternating the lead-singer position?

Reagan, from Georgia, asks for ways to make chores enjoyable. Our idea: turn chore time into creative time and imagine stories while she works, sing favorite songs, and invent games that challenge her to finish her chores faster.

Q’s for your kids: Which chores do you like doing—and why do you like them? Which chores would you rather not do? How could we divide up our chores more fairly, as a family, or get them done faster?

A reader says he can’t stand up for himself when someone hurts his feelings. We suggested that he use “I feel” statements to express himself without making accusations, as in “I feel hurt when you tease me like that. I would like you to stop.”

Q’s for your kids: What types of things do kids say that hurt other children’s feelings? How did you respond when someone said something hurtful or made you feel sad? Can you finish this sentence: “I feel hurt when…”

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As we approach the holiday season, what’s your kids’ favorite way to communicate with Grandma and Grandpa—whether or not they live nearby?

Parents Talk Back
As we approach the holiday season, what’s your kids’ favorite way to communicate with Grandma and Grandpa—whether or not they live nearby?
In-person visits.
68% (36 votes)
Skype or FaceTime.
19% (10 votes)
Calls via cell phones or landlines.
6% (3 votes)
Handwritten cards and letters.
8% (4 votes)
Total votes: 53