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Curious
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Inside Highlights September 2016

What’s Up with Goofus and Gallant

Highlights 4Cs

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Creative
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Curious
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Caring
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Confident
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In this month’s Highlights, Goofus and Gallant display vastly different ways to behave in public. Check out the Goofus and Gallant feature on page 10 of the September issue—or read the recaps below. Use the prompts that follow to talk to your child about rude—and thoughtful—behavior.
What’s Up with Goofus and Gallant
Recap: Goofus, exiting a movie theater, leaves behind a trail of popcorn, napkins, and soda, expecting someone else to clean up the mess. Gallant cleans up his litter and separates the trash from the recycling.

Conversation Starters:

1. What’s the first thing that comes to your mind when you see someone leaving behind a mess as Goofus did? What could you say to someone like Goofus in this situation?

2. What kinds of things are you and your friends expected to put away when you are in the classroom? What about in the lunchroom?

3. What can you do to make cleaning up fun or go faster?

4. In the feature, what actions indicate that Gallant is “environmentally friendly”?

Recap: Goofus snidely tells a peer who mislabels a bird overhead that she “doesn’t know anything.” In a similar situation, Gallant expresses his thoughts without being rude or judgmental.

Conversation Starters:

1. What does it mean to “talk down” to someone?

2. Has anyone ever made you feel bad or embarrassed about a mistake you made? How did you respond to the person who made you feel that way?

3. Why do Gallant’s remarks seem kind, not critical?

4. How could you respond to someone’s error without being mean or embarrassing that person?

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