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Kids in the Kitchen

Burritos for Breakfast!

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Whip this up in 10 minutes flat when your kids are so over bagels or cereal every day.
Easy, Cheesy Breakfast Burritos

Prep time: 10 minutes

Cook time: 3-5 minutes

Serves: 4

Burritos for Breakfast!
Easy, Cheesy Breakfast Burritos

Prep time: 10 minutes

Cook time: 3-5 minutes

Serves: 4

Despite my best, chef-like intentions, cooking a breakfast that requires more than 10 minutes definitely doesn’t factor into my weekday mornings. Unforeseen kitchen glitches seem to happen on a regular basis.

Just yesterday morning, while reaching for a colander to drain macaroni to put into my daughter’s thermos, the colander fell off an overhead rack and hit a container of blueberries on the counter, scattering them all over the kitchen floor. I must have trampled a dozen blueberries in my quest to wipe up the mess with paper towels. By the time the floor, and the soles of my shoes, had been purged of mashed blueberries, it was too late to make breakfast if I still wanted to catch my train.

Although my solution was to resort to bagels for the kids’ breakfast, on other mornings, when kitchen mishaps are less time-consuming to clean up, my kids love to make burritos. They’re ready in 10 minutes, and they can be customized by adding in extras, such as diced ham, cooked vegetables, or chopped raw tomato. Thanks to the eggs and cheese, these breakfast burritos have enough protein to keep everyone energized all morning. Encourage your child to be creative about add-ins when you’re making these together, and then enjoy on a busy weekday morning (or for a leisurely weekend brunch.)

Easy, Cheesy Breakfast Burritos

What You’ll Need
  • 6 to 8 eggs

  • ½ teaspoon salt

  • ½ teaspoon garlic powder

  • Pinch of freshly ground black pepper

  • 1 tablespoon olive oil

  • 4 (7- or 8-inch) whole wheat tortillas

  • 1 cup grated Cheddar or Mexican-blend cheese

  • 1 cup salsa (your favorite bottled salsa is fine)

What to Do
  1. Encourage your child to crack the eggs into a medium bowl. Fish out any specks of shell. Wash your hands and have your child wash her hands. Let her beat the eggs with a whisk. Add the salt, garlic powder, and pepper, and beat again.
  2. Heat the olive oil in a medium skillet over medium heat for 30 seconds. Add the egg mixture and cook, stirring occasionally with a large spoon for 2 minutes or until the eggs are scrambled.
  3. Help your child place the tortillas onto a large microwavable plate and slip them in the microwave. Heat for about 30 seconds, or until warm. Remove the plate from the microwave for your child, in case it is hot. Invite your little one to spoon some of the scrambled eggs into the middle of the tortilla, and top that with cheese and salsa.
    Teachable Moment: How does a microwave oven heat food?
    A microwave heats food by sending out invisible waves of energy that cause the water molecules in food to rotate quickly. Molecules in everyday objects (like food) are always vibrating and moving around; the faster they go, the hotter the object. A toaster or traditional broiler heats food by sending out infrared rays from the metal heating elements inside the appliance. Infrared rays increase the molecules’ movement from the outside in. A microwave works faster by making water molecules throughout the food move faster.—Andy Boyles
  4. Demonstrate how to fold the opposite sides of the tortillas toward the middle to enclose the filling. Serve with additional salsa, if you like.
    Teachable Moment: What makes salsa taste hot?
    Salsa, like other spicy foods, contains a chemical called capsaicin. Capsaicin fires up our taste buds—and it stimulates the nerve endings that sense pain. In very small amounts, capsaicin adds a little zing to the taste, much like the chemical piperine in pepper.—Andy Boyles

     

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