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Creative
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3-D PICTURE FRAMES

A three-dimensional way to display treasured photos

Highlights 4Cs

Curious, Creative, Caring, and Confident™
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Curious
The light bulb icon represents curiosity. For content about raising a curious child, look for this icon.
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Creative
The paint brush icon represents creativity. For content about raising a creative child, look for this icon.
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Caring
The holding hands icon represents caring. For content about raising a caring child, look for this icon.
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Confident
The thumbs up icon represents confidence. For content about raising a confident child, look for this icon.
Put your kid’s imagination to work, turning a snack box into a chunky frame for favorite family photos.
3-D Picture Frames
What You’ll Need
  • Snack box
  • Scissors
  • Scrapbook paper
  • Two long cardboard tubes
  • Construction paper or wrapping paper
  • Markers
  • Glue
  • White paper
  • Tape
  • Photo
What to Do
  1. Cut the top off a snack box.
  2. Cut teeth-shaped ridges along the top edge. Cover the box with scrapbook paper. For the towers, cover long cardboard tubes with construction paper or wrapping paper, then glue or tape them to the box.
  3. Cut a hole in the front of the box. For a photo pocket, loosely tape a piece of paper over the hole on the inside of the box, leaving the top open. Slide in a photo.
Extend the Fun

For younger kids: Reimagine the castle as a cat hideaway, a birdcage, or a horse stable, and decorate appropriately. An easy alternative is to make a house from a small tissue box: Cover it with paper. Using chalk, draw doors and windows. The chimney “smoke” is the tissue poking out the top!

For older kids: Go big! Instead of a snack box, use a shoe box and follow the same directions, inserting a larger photo or a favorite drawing. Or reimagine the castle as a fortress, bank, airplane hangar, or your favorite department store. What will you find in each?

How many times a week does your child participate in structured after-school activities—at school or elsewhere?

Parents Talk Back
How many times a week does your child participate in structured after-school activities—at school or elsewhere?
Once or twice a week.
36% (24 votes)
Three or four times a week.
23% (15 votes)
My child has activities every day, Monday through Friday.
12% (8 votes)
My child doesn’t participate in activities right now.
29% (19 votes)
Total votes: 66