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Creative
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COLOR-SHAPE HOPSCOTCH

A NEW TWIST ON AN OLD FAVORITE GAME

Highlights 4Cs

Curious, Creative, Caring, and Confident™
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Curious
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Creative
The paint brush icon represents creativity. For content about raising a creative child, look for this icon.
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Caring
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Confident
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Your kids will learn colors and shapes while practicing their reading skills with this cooler-than-cool hopscotch game.
A NEW TWIST ON AN OLD FAVORITE GAME
What You’ll Need
  • Craft foam (red, green, yellow, orange, blue)
  • Scissors
  • Markers
  • Cardstock
  • Metal fastener
What to Do
  1. Cut out 10 shapes (circles, squares, triangles) from different-colored craft foam: five sets of two that match in shape. Decorate one from each set with craft foam or markers.
  2. For a spinner, cut a large circle and an arrow from cardstock. Write rules on different sections of the circle, as shown. Attach the arrow with a metal fastener.  
To Play:

Create a path by laying the shapes outside or on a carpeted floor. Spin the spinner. Hop on one foot from shape to shape, following the rule the arrow pointed to. Rearrange the shapes to create new paths.

Extend the Fun

For younger kids: For kids who can’t read, call out the instructions on the spinner, or make up your own string of instructions (“red/green/blue,” “Hop on one foot”) for the kids to follow. Easiest of all: Set the craft-foam shapes on the ground in the classic hopscotch pattern and play the traditional game.

For older kids: Instead of playing hopscotch with the shapes, use them as decorations. Cut out more complicated shapes (hexagon, isosceles triangle, polygon) and decorate them more elaborately. Kids can cut out the letters of their name or spell out “Privacy Please” and glue them to the shapes. Or they can affix the shapes to their bedroom door, frame a mirror as a colorful border, or outline the molding around the ceiling or floor of their room.

How many times a week does your child participate in structured after-school activities—at school or elsewhere?

Parents Talk Back
How many times a week does your child participate in structured after-school activities—at school or elsewhere?
Once or twice a week.
36% (25 votes)
Three or four times a week.
21% (15 votes)
My child has activities every day, Monday through Friday.
16% (11 votes)
My child doesn’t participate in activities right now.
27% (19 votes)
Total votes: 70