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Creative
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Colorful Butterflies

A pretty craft to perk up any room of the house

Highlights 4Cs

Curious, Creative, Caring, and Confident™
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Curious
The light bulb icon represents curiosity. For content about raising a curious child, look for this icon.
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Creative
The paint brush icon represents creativity. For content about raising a creative child, look for this icon.
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Caring
The holding hands icon represents caring. For content about raising a caring child, look for this icon.
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Confident
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When children make little butterflies, their hands, fingers, and eyes synchronize. It’s a fine-motor-skills celebration, packaged as pretty play.
Colorful Butterflies
What You’ll Need
  • Watercolor paper
  • Scissors
  • Watercolors or acrylic paints
  • Chenille sticks
  • Ribbon

From watercolor paper, cut out two oval shapes.

Using watercolors or acrylic paints and water, decorate the ovals. Let them dry.

Accordion fold the ovals. Pinch them together in the middle. Wrap a chenille stick around the center and twist to form antennae and a body.

Add a ribbon hanger.

Extend the Fun

For younger kids: Tape several butterflies to a window sash, side by side, so they flutter in the breeze. Or make a mobile: Bind crisscrossed sticks with a figure eight of string, attach your butterflies to the four corners of the sticks, and hang your mobile from a hook in the ceiling, or outdoors from a tree with outstretched branches.

For older kids: Study the colors of real butterflies, like the monarch, the Luna moth, and the painted lady (you’re a lepidopterist!) and paint your butterfly wings accordingly. When the weather warms up, plant flowers that attract these delicate creatures, and see who flutters by! Bonus project: Memorize the French word for butterfly—papillon—and look up the dog of the same name. You’ll see how he got his name. (Hint: Look at his ears.)

Craft by Jennifer K. Day, text by Mary Sears

Who are your child’s favorite heroes at this moment?

Parents Talk Back
Who are your child’s favorite heroes at this moment?
Athletes
9% (5 votes)
Fictional characters
9% (5 votes)
Artists and musicians
11% (6 votes)
Cartoon and game figures
21% (12 votes)
Celebrities and entertainers
5% (3 votes)
Mom, Dad, or other relatives
45% (25 votes)
Newsmakers or politicians
0% (0 votes)
Total votes: 56