x
Creative
The paint brush icon represents creativity. For content about raising a creative child, look for this icon.

Confetti Eggs

A Mexican Easter Tradition

Highlights 4Cs

Curious, Creative, Caring, and Confident™
x
Curious
The light bulb icon represents curiosity. For content about raising a curious child, look for this icon.
x
Creative
The paint brush icon represents creativity. For content about raising a creative child, look for this icon.
x
Caring
The holding hands icon represents caring. For content about raising a caring child, look for this icon.
x
Confident
The thumbs up icon represents confidence. For content about raising a confident child, look for this icon.
Eggshells filled with confetti, called cascarones, are a Mexican tradition during Easter. A child gently crushes the egg over a friend’s (or sibling’s) head so the confetti showers out. It may sound strange, but it’s actually lots of fun.
Confetti Eggs
What You’ll Need
  • Butter knife
  • Eggs
  • Small bowl
  • Paint or crayons
  • Paintbrush
  • Paper
  • Confetti
  • Scissors
  • Tissue paper
  • Glue
What to Do
  1. Use the butter knife to make a small hole in the bottom of the egg.
  2. Empty the egg into a small bowl. Rinse the inside of the egg with water. Let dry.
  3. Decorate the eggshells with paint or crayons.
  4. Roll a piece of paper to create a funnel. Place the small end inside the hole. Pour the confetti through the funnel.
  5. Cut a small piece of tissue paper. Glue it over the hole. Let dry.     
Extend the Fun

For younger kids: An empty eggshell is fragile, especially in little hands. Support the delicate shells in an egg cup or a small bowl to make the decorating easier.

For older kids: For fancier eggshells, dye each egg with food coloring, vinegar, and hot water (10 drops food coloring/3 tablespoons vinegar/1 cup water) before emptying so the decorated eggs have a background color. As an alternative to confetti, fill an egg with M&M’s and crush it in the palm of a pal’s outstretched hand. Yum!

Craft by Jill Douglas; text by Mary Sears

Who are your child’s favorite heroes at this moment?

Parents Talk Back
Who are your child’s favorite heroes at this moment?