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Creative
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Create Your Own Constellation

A Craft and Mini Science Lesson in One!

Highlights 4Cs

Curious, Creative, Caring, and Confident™
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Curious
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Creative
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Caring
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Confident
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Kids who recognize the shapes of triangles, squares, and rectangles on paper can find those same shapes in the night sky. A group of stars that form a pattern is called a constellation, and learning about them can begin a lifelong fascination with our infinite universe.
Create Your Own Constellation
What You’ll Need
  • Rocks (4 or 5; flat ones work best)
  • White and black paint
  • Paintbrush
  • Glow-in-the-dark paint
What to Do

1. Wash and dry your rocks.

2. Paint white stars on the top of your rocks. Let dry.

3. Paint the stars with glow-in-the-dark paint. Let dry.  Then paint the area around the stars black. Let dry.

4. Place your rocks in a sunny spot, such as a windowsill or backyard. Arrange the rocks to make your constellation. The stars will soak up the light during the day and glow at night.

Extend the Fun

For younger kids: Be a constellation detective. Look out your window late at night and find the Big Dipper; the Little Dipper; Cassiopeia (a queen sitting in a chair); Leo (the crouching lion); and Pegasus (a horse with wings). Arrange your indoor constellation to mimic their arrangement. Fun fact: The sun is a star.

For older kids: Visit a planetarium or peek through a telescope to bring the stars up close. Invent your own constellation and give it a fancy name based on your name or nickname. Fun fact: The movie Beetlejuice derives its title from a star named Betelgeuse, which is part of the constellation Orion the Hunter (look for three bright stars in a row).

Craft by Edna Harrington; text by Mary Sears

You’re looking for fresh, kid-oriented activities for the summer. What sounds right for your child? Choose one answer.

Parents Talk Back
You’re looking for fresh, kid-oriented activities for the summer. What sounds right for your child? Choose one answer.