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DIY Halloween Trick-or-Treat Bag

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For the kids who can’t get enough Halloween crafts, try this cute DIY jack-o’-lantern trick-or-treat bag. You can make it with your kids this year, then save it to use year after year.
For the kids who can’t get enough Halloween crafts, try this cute DIY jack-o’-lantern trick-or-treat bag.
What You’ll Need
  • Yarn

  • Large-eye needle

  • 2 orange washcloths

  • Scissors

  • Black felt

  • Glue

  • Ribbon

What to Do

1. Thread the yarn through the large-eye needle and sew the two washcloths together along three sides.

2. Cut out a nose, mouth, and eyes from the felt. Glue them to the bag.

3. Tie a ribbon to the stitching near the top of the bag to make a handle.

Extend the Fun

Younger kids: If your child isn’t ready to sew the whole bag himself, ask him to help you get started or to finish up. It might take more time than you’re used to, but when you can make this bag together, he’ll be especially proud to use it.  

Older kids: Turn this bag into a guessing game: How many pieces of candy will fit in the bag? Ask your child to make a prediction. Talk about whether that number would change if the candies were all big or all small. Then have your child test her guess by filling the bag with candy or other similarly-sized items (like granola bars or small boxes of raisins).   

Money is a touchy topic for many American families. How likely are you to discuss a job loss or serious financial setback with or in front of your children? Choose one answer.

Parents Talk Back
Money is a touchy topic for many American families. How likely are you to discuss a job loss or serious financial setback with or in front of your children? Choose one answer.
I would not discuss a serious financial setback/job loss with my children. I wouldn’t want them to worry.
24% (11 votes)
I would consider discussing a financial setback/job loss with my children—they'd probably find out anyway.
31% (14 votes)
I would have no problem discussing a financial setback/job loss with my children.
44% (20 votes)
Total votes: 45