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Creative
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FALL FIND-IT

With the scent of autumn in the air, it’s time for a treasure hunt!

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Curious
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Creative
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Caring
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Confident
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Cast your kids as 21st-century explorers—with a bit of amateur artist thrown in—as you amble about, looking for the harbingers of fall. Then glue your finds to paper as a keepsake. This activity is fun for the whole family, and easy enough for even the littlest members of your tribe.
Girl pressing fall leaves in scrap book

What You’ll Need

  • Pencil
  • Notebook
  • Paper bag
  • Glue
  • Construction paper

What to Do

  1. Go on a family treasure hunt, looking for signs of fall. Find as many of these as you can: acorn, squirrel, yellow leaf, twigs shaped in a funny way, leaf that has two different colors, pinecone, woolly bear caterpillar, chipmunk, pumpkin, and any other small object that captures your attention.
  2. In your notebook, draw what you see. When you find an object on the ground, save it in your paper bag (except the caterpillar, squirrel, or chipmunk, of course!).
  3. When you’re back home, use glue, paper, and your found objects to make a fall collage on a piece of paper. Include the date and display on the fridge or family bulletin board, then save as a keepsake.

Extend the Fun

For younger kids: Play a counting game as you glue each leaf or acorn on your paper; add up all the items you’ve found. Or make a shadow box from the top of a notecard box and glue your treasures inside. Send it to Grandma, or a relative or friend who lives in a warmer climate.

For older kids: Instead of looking for little objects, go big! Drag home some fallen logs to make seating around a fire pit; stack big stones as a sculpture in your yard. Or make an obstacle course using the things you’ve found.

Tell us: What’s your take on homework? Please select the sentence below that best reflects your point of view.

Parents Talk Back
Tell us: What’s your take on homework? Please select the sentence below that best reflects your point of view.
Kids today get too much homework.
31% (15 votes)
Homework is important. Kids need to stay on task to keep up with the pack.
19% (9 votes)
Parents should be encouraged to help young kids with homework.
35% (17 votes)
Parents should encourage kids to complete homework assignments on their own.
15% (7 votes)
Total votes: 48