x
Creative
The paint brush icon represents creativity. For content about raising a creative child, look for this icon.

Fireworks Painting

Highlights 4Cs

x
Creative
The paint brush icon represents creativity. For content about raising a creative child, look for this icon.
x
Curious
The light bulb icon represents curiosity. For content about raising a curious child, look for this icon.
x
Caring
The holding hands icon represents caring. For content about raising a caring child, look for this icon.
x
Confident
The thumbs up icon represents confidence. For content about raising a confident child, look for this icon.
The great thing about fireworks is the continuous surprise—you never know what you’re going to see next! Fireworks painting is just like that: Each one is different. Replicate the festive starburst effects on paper, using liquid watercolors or food coloring, and squeeze bottles, eyedroppers, and straws to blow the paint around.
Fireworks Painting

Fireworks painting can get messy (splat!), so work outside if you can. If you’re indoors, lay 2 yards of oilcloth, some towels, or a splat mat beneath your workspace to make cleanup easy.

Creativity is the watchword here, but we offer three methods your kids might want to try. Or use all three methods on one big sheet of paper to create a giant fireworks scene, like the finale on the Fourth of July. Allow your creations to dry flat overnight. Aren’t the rainbow fireworks beautiful?

What You’ll Need
  • Watercolor paper, available in pads or large sheets wherever art supplies are sold
  • Empty muffin tin or several small bowls
  • Liquid watercolors or diluted food coloring in six colors
  • Eyedroppers, one for each paint color
  • Empty squeeze bottle
  • Straw
What You'll Do

For all methods, squeeze six colors of liquid watercolors or diluted food coloring into a muffin tin or small bowls.

Method 1/Air Bursts: Using an eyedropper, squeeze some watercolor paint on the paper; vary the amount of paint to change the size of the fireworks. Then use the empty squeeze bottle to spread the watercolors in a fireworks pattern, squeezing air in big bursts at different angles. Or blow the paint with a straw to see how it scatters.

Method 2/Air Bubbles: Using an eyedropper, deposit a pool of watercolor paint on the paper. Put the end of the empty eyedropper in that pool of color and squeeze. Big watercolor bubbles will form and pop, creating a freeform pattern.

Method 3/High and Mighty: This is by far the messiest (and favorite) method, but getting messy can be good for kids! Fill an eyedropper with varying amounts of watercolor and forcefully squeeze it out from about a foot above the paper. This creates a dramatic spray of color on the paper that looks just like fireworks! Experiment with the technique, squeezing the full eyedroppers at a various heights.

Join Our
Email List