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Creative
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Flameless Candle

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Lighting a candle is not always practical with kids in the house. This flameless “flickering” candle uses materials you have at home and the kids can make it safely. It’s also a great activity to do at holiday parties or in large groups.
Flameless Candle
What You’ll Need
  • Glue
  • Wrapping paper
  • Short cardboard tube
  • Safety scissors
  • Red and yellow construction paper
  • 6-inch piece of thread
What You'll Do
  1. Glue a strip of wrapping paper around the cardboard tube.
  2. Fold the red construction paper in half and cut out a flame. You should end up with two identical flames.
  3. Lay the thread lengthwise on one flame, leaving a few inches on either end. Spread glue on one side of the other flame, and glue the flames together.
  4. Cut two 3½-inch diameter circles from yellow construction paper. Then cut out the centers.
  5. Spread glue on one side of one yellow halo. Center the flame in the middle of that halo, and lay the thread across it. Add the other halo. Trim excess thread.
  6. Cut two slits in the top of the candle. Slide the halo into the slits, with the flame straight up in the center.
  7. Breathe gently on the flame to make it flicker.
Extend the Fun

Younger kids: Little ones might not be ready to cut the flame and the halo. To provide more cutting opportunities (you know, fine motor skill work), have your child use safety scissors to cut up pieces of wrapping paper for decorating the cardboard tube. They can cut big and small pieces, and then glue them on like a collage.

Older kids: Way back when, people relied on candles for light. Challenge your child to think about how things worked then versus now. How did people see when it was dark? If people traveled at night, how did they know where to go? How much light did one candle give off? For a bonus challenge, experiment with living by candlelight (just for a few hours). Try only candles at dinnertime or a fire in the fireplace during family reading time.

 

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