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Good Deed Pomegranate

A Kindness Card for Rosh Hashanah

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Curious, Creative, Caring, and Confident™
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Juicy pomegranate seeds are often eaten on Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year. The seeds symbolize mitzvahs—good deeds, done with heart and soul, that make the world a better place. Help your child make a kindness card that looks like the inside of a pomegranate; the seeds are their intended good deeds. Ask your child, “How many kindness seeds did you plant today?”
Good Deed Pomegranate
What You’ll Need
  • Red cardstock
  • White cardstock
  • Scissors
  • Glue
  • Markers
What to Do
  1. From cardstock, cut out a red pomegranate-shaped card, two white circles, and red pomegranate seeds.
  2. Glue the white circles inside the card. Glue the red seeds on the circles.
  3. On each seed, write a good deed you plan to do in the coming year.
  4. Keep your card in sight, on a bulletin board or your desk, to remind you of your good intentions.                                     
Extend the Fun

For younger kids: Drop a stone in water. Notice the ripple effect. Now, translate that to real life: Have you done a good deed that has spread kindness? Maybe you’ve made a new friend or avoided an argument by being cooperative. Talk about the ripple effect of your good deed.

For older kids: Sample a real pomegranate! (You may need a parent’s help to cut off the crown of the pomegranate and score the skin top to bottom into four quarters.) Put on an apron. Submerge the pomegranate in a bowl of water (this stops the juice from getting all over) and pull it apart. You’ll see several chambers inside. Use your fingers to loosen the seeds from the white pith. The seeds will fall to the bottom of the bowl. Scoop them out and snack on the tasty morsels.

Craft by Tara Mead; text by Mary Sears

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Parents Talk Back
How many books do you currently have in your house? Include books on tape, audio books, and eBooks, as well as all hard and soft cover books that you own or have borrowed. Select one answer below.
1 to 10
4% (3 votes)
10 to 20
4% (3 votes)
20 to 50
8% (6 votes)
50 to 100
15% (11 votes)
More than 100
69% (51 votes)
Total votes: 74