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Creative
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Green Gobbler

Watch This Jointed Monster Snap Up Some Fun!

Highlights 4Cs

Curious, Creative, Caring, and Confident™
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Curious
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Creative
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Caring
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Confident
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Your kids will learn about joints and hinges by putting together this make-it-yourself Green Gobbler craft. As they fit the pieces together, they’ll also be improving their dexterity (cutting and pasting) and their sequencing skills (following directions).
Green Gobbler
What You’ll Need
  • Thin cardboard
  • Cardstock
  • Markers
  • Metal paper fasteners
What to Do

1. Glue two sheets of thin cardboard together. Glue cardstock on top.

2. Draw the shapes and dots shown. Cut out the shapes.

3. Add an eye and a nose with cardstock and markers. Punch holes in the dots.

4. Use metal fasteners to connect the shapes as shown.

5. Manipulate the gobbler to make him move.

Extend the Fun

For younger kids: Pretend the Green Gobbler eats only green food—and green desserts! What foods might he enjoy? Do you like them too? Design a menu and decorate it using crayons and stickers. If you can’t write, dictate your menu to a grown-up.

For older kids: Pose the Green Gobbler around the house in hilarious positions to surprise your family—like a dinosaur of yore, he can eat a cookie in the kitchen, grab a washcloth in the bathroom, snatch the remote in the TV room, devour a stick on the front lawn or the fire escape. Or use the Green Gobbler as a bulletin board of sorts. Stretch him and stand him on your desk; stick Post-It notes on him to remind you of homework assignments, birthdays, or upcoming sports events and parties.

 Craft by Angie Neer; text by Mary Sears.

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