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Creative
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Lady Liberty Crown

Add a history lesson to this patriotic paper-plate craft!

Highlights 4Cs

Curious, Creative, Caring, and Confident™
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Curious
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Creative
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Caring
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Confident
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Let your kids learn a little history as they use their crafting skills to make a glowing paper-plate holiday headdress.
Lady Liberty Crown
What You’ll Need
  • Scissors
  • Paper plates
  • Paint
  • Tape
  • Glue or stapler
  • Glow stick
What to Do

1. Cut a 4-inch circle from the center of a paper plate.

2. Cut 1½-inch-long slits every ½ inch to make 24 tabs. Remove every second tab, as shown.
3. Repeat steps 1 and 2 with a second paper plate.
4. Bend the 12 tabs on each plate, line them up as shown in the photo, and glue or staple them together.

5. Paint the crown—ours is blue on top, red on bottom. To make the spikes of the crown, cut seven tall narrow triangles from a paper plate (see photo). Tape them to the top of the crown and bend them upward. (Fun fact: on the Statue of Liberty, the seven spikes represent the sun, the seven seas, and the seven continents.)
6. When it’s time to wear your crown, activate a glow stick and attach it around the crown. (Tape it in place if necessary.)

Extend the Fun

For younger kids: Read a story about the Statue of Liberty. Recite the Pledge of Allegiance. Simplify the concepts of liberty and justice and discuss them with your kids. (Give examples such as, “A hamster was liberated when he escaped his cage,” or “The girl got justice when her brother was punished for being rude to her.”) The date July 4, 1776 is written in Roman numerals on the tablet in Lady Liberty’s hand. Practice writing VII - IV – MDCCLXXVI.

For older kids: Memorize the poem on the Statue of Liberty’s pedestal. “Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free…” is just part of “The New Colossus” by Emma Lazarus. Too long? Assign a section to each person in your family, then recite the poem in order at your Fourth of July barbecue.