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Creative
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Leprechaun “Hair” Planter

Make a funny-face planter, set it in a sunny spot, and watch the hair-raising results

Highlights 4Cs

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Curious
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Creative
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Caring
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Confident
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This craft teaches cut-color-and-glue skills, cultivates patience, and sows some happy smiles.
Leprechaun “Hair” Planter
What You’ll Need
  • Quart-size carton
  • Seed-starting medium or potting soil
  • Grass seed
  • Craft foam
  • Scissors
  • Glue
  • Colored markers
  • Wiggle eyes*
What to Do
  1. Cut a quart-size carton 2½ inches from the base. Punch a few drainage holes in the bottom.
  2. Glue craft foam around the carton. Create ears and a bow tie using craft foam, and glue them on. Add details with markers. Glue on wiggle eyes.
  3. Fill the carton with potting soil topped with grass seed.
  4. Put the carton in sunlight, water the seeds, and watch the leprechaun’s “hair” grow.

*Wiggle eyes are potential choking hazards for kids ages 4 and younger, so close supervision is a must.                                                

Extend the Fun

For younger kids:  Using craft foam, markers, and wiggle eyes, have your youngster create different faces on each side of the carton. Try opposites: happy/sad, awake/asleep, boy/girl. Or draw a favorite animal: cat, dog, gentle bunny or lamb, or scary monster. For a no-grow alternative with a spiky effect, poke the soil with drinking straws, bamboo skewers, artificial flowers, crayons, or colored pencils

For older kids:  Change it up. Instead of grass, let your child plant herbs. In 10 days, the sprouts of feathery dill or fluffy cilantro start to appear; in two weeks, spiky chives or bouncy oregano. Broaden your gardening knowledge by transplanting the herbs outdoors as the weather warms. Water and pinch back accordingly.

How do you reward excellence or achievement?

Parents Talk Back
How do you reward excellence or achievement?
Praise or a pat on the back.
80% (37 votes)
An inexpensive gift or toy.
9% (4 votes)
A gift of substantial value.
7% (3 votes)
We do nothing—it’s expected.
4% (2 votes)
Total votes: 46