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DIY Telescope

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Look up in the sky! It’s a bird! It’s a plane! It’s… yes, that’s a bird. And that’s a plane. When you make this telescope with your child, have fun watching for birds, planes, and other flying objects. It’s an easy craft that can change your kids’ perspective and help them focus on things around them in a different way.
When you make this telescope with your child, have fun watching for birds, planes, and other flying objects.
What You’ll Need
  • Cardstock
  • Cardboard tube
  • Rubber bands
  • Stickers
  • Markers
What to Do

1. Roll a piece of cardstock over a cardboard tube. Add some rubber bands.

2. Decorate your telescope with stickers and markers.

3. Pull the tube to make your telescope longer.

Extend the Fun

Younger children: Telescopes are great for watching birds. Go outside or look out a big window. Then ask your child where he thinks he’ll see birds. In a tree? In the sky? On the sidewalk? On the grass? Encourage him to find birds with his telescope and describe them to you.

Older children: Have your child to go outside with the telescope around dusk. She can look across the sky to find stars, airplanes, satellites—maybe even a shooting star. Use an app or a book to look up constellations together, and see if she can find some of them.   

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As we approach the holiday season, what’s your kids’ favorite way to communicate with Grandma and Grandpa—whether or not they live nearby?

Parents Talk Back
As we approach the holiday season, what’s your kids’ favorite way to communicate with Grandma and Grandpa—whether or not they live nearby?
In-person visits.
68% (36 votes)
Skype or FaceTime.
19% (10 votes)
Calls via cell phones or landlines.
6% (3 votes)
Handwritten cards and letters.
8% (4 votes)
Total votes: 53