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Curious
The light bulb icon represents curiosity. For content about raising a curious child, look for this icon.

Night Sky Mobile

A fun project for your pint-sized star gazer

Highlights 4Cs

Curious, Creative, Caring, and Confident™
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Curious
The light bulb icon represents curiosity. For content about raising a curious child, look for this icon.
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Creative
The paint brush icon represents creativity. For content about raising a creative child, look for this icon.
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Caring
The holding hands icon represents caring. For content about raising a caring child, look for this icon.
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Confident
The thumbs up icon represents confidence. For content about raising a confident child, look for this icon.
Heads up, junior astronomers! This mini Milky Way soaks up the sunlight and glows all night.
Night Sky Mobile
What You’ll Need
  • Pencil
  • White craft foam
  • Scissors
  • Hole punch
  • White glow-in-the-dark paint
  • Paintbrush
  • Yarn
  • 12-inch stick
What to Do

1. Using a pencil, draw a moon and two stars on the craft foam. Cut them out.
2. Punch a hole in the top of the moon and stars.

3. Paint both sides of the moon and stars with glow paint. When dry, paint both sides again.

4. When the second coat of paint is dry, hang the moon and stars from the stick using short pieces of yarn.
5. Tie a long piece of yarn to each end of the stick. Hang the mobile from a curtain rod in your child’s bedroom; the moon and stars will soak up the sunlight by day and glow at night.




Extend the Fun

For younger kids: Make ground-level glowworms. Cut leftover craft foam into small, friendly shapes—dog, cat, butterfly, bird—and paint them with glow-in-the-dark paint. Scatter these critters on a bedside table or tape to the bedroom wall or the front of dresser drawers to comfort little ones at night.

For older kids: The summer sky is full of twinkling stars and planets that are easy to see with the naked eye—or use binoculars for a closer look. (Search “night sky” and the name of your state.) Fun bedtime reading for ages 7 and older: Farmers’ Almanac. Kids can plot the phases of the moon and find out when the next meteor showers or solar and lunar eclipses are due.

How many times a week does your child participate in structured after-school activities—at school or elsewhere?

Parents Talk Back
How many times a week does your child participate in structured after-school activities—at school or elsewhere?
Once or twice a week.
36% (25 votes)
Three or four times a week.
21% (15 votes)
My child has activities every day, Monday through Friday.
16% (11 votes)
My child doesn’t participate in activities right now.
27% (19 votes)
Total votes: 70