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Paper Candy-Cane Ornament

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DIY ornaments don’t get any easier than this. One piece of paper, one marker, and a pencil for rolling. And when it’s this easy, kids won’t stop at just one. Expect your house to look like a candy factory in under 10 minutes (minus the sugar hype). Help your kids hang these ornaments on the tree or add them to presents as fun gift-toppers.
Paper Candy Cane Ornament
What You’ll Need
  • White paper (printer paper cut to a square works well)
  • Markers
  • Pencil (optional)
  • Tape
What to Do

1. Make stripes on about ½ inch of the top and side of a white sheet of paper.

2. Turn the paper over and roll the paper toward the opposite corner (use a pencil if needed). Stripes will appear as you roll.

3. Tape down the loose corner of paper (and shake out the pencil if you used one).

4. Roll the top of the cane around a pencil or marker several times to form a crook.

5. Trim both ends of the candy cane so they’re flat.

6. Hang your candy-cane ornament on your Christmas tree.

Extend the fun

Younger kids: Encourage your child to experiment with colors and stripes of various size. She can make a candy cane in her favorite colors or see what happens when she makes three skinny stripes instead of one thick stripe.

Older kids: A pencil makes a skinny candy cane, so ask your child for suggestions about how to make a fatter candy cane. Together, see which of his ideas work and what you discover in the process. And even if you think something is too big to come out OK, let your child try it first. Part of discovery is learning what doesn’t work.

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