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Curious
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Space Painting

Highlights 4Cs

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Curious
The light bulb icon represents curiosity. For content about raising a curious child, look for this icon.
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Creative
The paint brush icon represents creativity. For content about raising a creative child, look for this icon.
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Caring
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Confident
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Calling all space enthusiasts! Let your kids create their own galaxy. With a box of crayons and some black watercolor paint, white paper is transformed into a stellar and imaginative piece of art.
Let your kids create their own galaxy. With a box of crayons and some black watercolor paint, white paper is transformed into a stellar and imaginative piece of art.
What You’ll Need
  • White paper

  • Crayons

  • Black watercolor paint

  • Paintbrush

What to Do

1. On the paper, use light colored crayons (including white) to draw pictures of planets, stars, spaceships, satellites, and other things you might see in space.

2. Cover the whole paper with black watercolor paint, and let it dry.

 

Extend the Fun

Younger kids: Before your child covers the drawing with the paint, ask what she thinks will happen. It makes sense that the black watercolor paint will turn everything black. When it doesn’t, talk about the wax in crayons and how it resists the watercolor.

Older kids: Ask your child to describe what’s going on in the picture. Maybe a rocket is going to explore a new planet or the rings around a planet are changing color. Encourage your child to write down the story. Then hang both the art and story on the fridge, and take a picture of both to share with relatives.

Thinking about your child’s school curriculum, how do you view the current quality and quantity of STEM offerings (science, technology, engineering, and math)? Please select one of the following:

Parents Talk Back
Thinking about your child’s school curriculum, how do you view the current quality and quantity of STEM offerings (science, technology, engineering, and math)? Please select one of the following:
There is not enough emphasis on science, technology, engineering, and math.
53% (18 votes)
There are an appropriate number of offerings in science, technology, engineering, and math.
21% (7 votes)
There is too much emphasis on science, technology, engineering, and math.
9% (3 votes)
Not sure.
18% (6 votes)
Total votes: 34