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Creative
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DINO FEET

stomping around is so much fun!

Highlights 4Cs

Curious, Creative, Caring, and Confident™
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Curious
The light bulb icon represents curiosity. For content about raising a curious child, look for this icon.
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Creative
The paint brush icon represents creativity. For content about raising a creative child, look for this icon.
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Caring
The holding hands icon represents caring. For content about raising a caring child, look for this icon.
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Confident
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Pretend-play and crafting skills are the focus here: be the first to roam the earth—or the first to roam the house in the morning—wearing these three-toed dinosaur feet.
What You’ll Need
  • Pencil
  • Scissors
  • Paintbrush
  • Large pieces of craft foam
  • Small pieces of craft foam
  • Scissors
  • Paint
  • Glue
What to Do

1. Use a pencil to draw two big dinosaur feet on the craft foam. (Dinos had three toes.) Cut a 2-inch X near the “heel” of each foot, for your child’s foot to go through.

2. Cut out the feet and paint them; let them dry completely.

3. Glue small pieces of craft foam on the feet as “toenails.” Let dry.

4. Slip your child’s feet through the X’s, adjust the foam around his ankles, and let him stomp around like a dinosaur!

Extend the Fun

For younger kids: Birds are modern-day descendants of dinosaurs! But dinos couldn’t grip branches as birds can. Birds developed a fourth toe that allows them to do this. Do a bit of bird-watching and imagine the birds as prehistoric dinosaurs. Can you see any resemblance?

For older kids: Five feet nine inches is the longest dinosaur footprint discovered so far. Using chalk, draw a dinosaur foot on a driveway, the sidewalk, or a lawn, and outline the footprint with rocks. Add three more footprints and you can imagine how big the dinosaurs were when they roamed the earth.

How many times a week does your child participate in structured after-school activities—at school or elsewhere?

Parents Talk Back
How many times a week does your child participate in structured after-school activities—at school or elsewhere?
Once or twice a week.
37% (24 votes)
Three or four times a week.
22% (14 votes)
My child has activities every day, Monday through Friday.
12% (8 votes)
My child doesn’t participate in activities right now.
29% (19 votes)
Total votes: 65