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Valentine Mailbox in 7 Easy Steps

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Here’s an adorable Valentine’s Day craft that allows your kids to express their creativity: a colorful countertop mailbox to deliver (and show off!) valentine cards.
Valentine Mailbox in 7 Easy Steps
What You’ll Need
  • 1 large, round cardboard container
  • 1 piece of thin cardboard 8 ½ x 11 inches
  • Heart-shaped stickers
  • 2 Velcro dots
  • Safety scissors
  • Air-dry clay or washi tape
  • 1 red lollipop
  • Tape
  • Glue
What to Do
  1. Draw a straight line from the top to the bottom of the cardboard container; cut along that line.
  2. Cut off (and discard) lid and base.
  3. Tape red construction paper to the remaining U-shaped tube; that’s the mailbox top.
  4. Size and cut cardboard pieces to make the mailbox door, base, and back. Cover them with red construction paper and tape them to the mailbox top. Leave the door open for now.
  5. Cut out one small rectangular tab from the remaining cardboard sheet. Glue it to the top of the mailbox door. Place one Velcro dot on the tab, and one on the top of the mailbox itself. This will be the latch to keep the mailbox closed.
  6. Decorate with stickers. Use air-dry clay or decorative tape to secure the lollipop to the mailbox’s side.
  7. Add cards. Display.
Extend the Fun

For younger kids: Here’s your chance to review shapes with your little craft enthusiast. Point to the heart and encourage him to identify it. Then, ask him to find a circle (the Velcro dot), a rectangle (the tab or tape), a square, (stamps, if you have or want to make some), and more. Help him sharpen his scissors skills as he cuts out more shapes.

For older kids: Help boost creative writing and fine motor coordination with this simple activity: Let your child select attractive blank cards, unlined paper, and envelopes to decorate. Add valentine messages for relatives and friends. Suggest a few prompts such as “You are my friend because…” or “I like the way you…” and let her do the rest.

A playdate heads south when your five-year-old and another child have a minor disagreement. The dispute gets heated. You:

Parents Talk Back
A playdate heads south when your five-year-old and another child have a minor disagreement. The dispute gets heated. You:
Let the kids work it out. (They’ll have to learn that skill eventually.)
27% (13 votes)
Step in to ease tension and help solve the problem.
67% (32 votes)
Chirp, “It’s snack time!”
4% (2 votes)
Vow to never invite that child for another playdate.
0% (0 votes)
End the playdate early.
2% (1 vote)
Total votes: 48