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Creative
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Bubbling Slime

A Spooky Science Experiment

Highlights 4Cs

Curious, Creative, Caring, and Confident™
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Curious
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Creative
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Caring
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Confident
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Double trouble, boil and bubble—things are looking spooky! It’s the perfect time to stir up some green goo. This science experiment is disguised as fun as kids learn to measure and predict an outcome. Beware: Things might get messy! Wear plastic gloves to handle the slime.
Bubbly Slime
What You’ll Need
  • Large container
  • Small container
  • Baking pan
  • School glue
  • Baking soda
  • Green food coloring
  • Vinegar
  • Contact-lens solution (ReNu Fresh) or saline solution that contains boric acid and sodium borate
What to Do

1. Mix ½ cup of school glue, 2 tablespoons of baking soda, and several drops of green food coloring in a large container.

2. Mix ¼ cup of vinegar and 2 teaspoons of saline solution in a small container.

3. Place both containers into a baking pan. Pour the vinegar solution into the glue mixture and stir a few times. The concoction will bubble as the baking soda reacts with the vinegar.

4. When the bubbling stops, mix about 3 more tablespoons of baking soda into the slime to make it easier to handle.

Extend the Fun

For younger kids: Use different food colorings to make goo of another color. Mix two shades to discover other colors: red + yellow = orange. Blue + red = purple.

For older kids: Know the science behind the slime. The boric acid and sodium borate in the contact-lens or saline solution react with the other ingredients to create the slime.

Text by Mary Sears