x
Creative
The paint brush icon represents creativity. For content about raising a creative child, look for this icon.

Giant Tic-Tac-Toe

A new twist on a family-favorite game

Highlights 4Cs

x
Curious
The light bulb icon represents curiosity. For content about raising a curious child, look for this icon.
x
Creative
The paint brush icon represents creativity. For content about raising a creative child, look for this icon.
x
Caring
The holding hands icon represents caring. For content about raising a caring child, look for this icon.
x
Confident
The thumbs up icon represents confidence. For content about raising a confident child, look for this icon.
Count, take turns, accept victory and defeat—it’s all part of this lively game, played indoors or outside, for kids of all ages.
Giant Tic-Tac-Toe
What You’ll Need
  • chalk or masking tape
  • 20 six-inch paper plates
  • marker
  • stapler
What to Do
  1. Use chalk or masking tape to make a tic-tac-toe grid on the floor (indoors) or the ground (outdoors).
  2. Decorate five plates with X’s and five with O’s.
  3. Staple each decorated plate to a plain plate to make disks.

To Play:
Stand two feet away from the tic-tac-toe grid. Take turns tossing the disks, one at a time. The first person to get three disks in a row wins that round. Play until you are out of energy!

A trivia note:
When a tic-tac-toe game is a tie, it’s often called a “cat’s game,” but no one is quite sure why. Some think this refers to a cat that chases its tail but never wins. Can you think of any other explanations for this phrase?

Extend the Fun

For younger kids:  Strategy doesn’t come naturally to little ones, so give them an extra turn at Giant Tic-Tac-Toe or practice on a smaller scale with a paper game of tic-tac-toe. Even if a child is too young to participate in an actual game, she can practice drawing X’s and O’s or bending chenille sticks (aka pipe cleaners) into those shapes.

For older kids: Raise the stakes! Make more disks and enlarge the game board into a 4 x 4 or 5 x 5 grid to increase the challenge. Who will be the first to get four or five in a row?

Money is a touchy topic for many American families. How likely are you to discuss a job loss or serious financial setback with or in front of your children? Choose one answer.

Parents Talk Back
Money is a touchy topic for many American families. How likely are you to discuss a job loss or serious financial setback with or in front of your children? Choose one answer.
I would not discuss a serious financial setback/job loss with my children. I wouldn’t want them to worry.
26% (11 votes)
I would consider discussing a financial setback/job loss with my children—they'd probably find out anyway.
33% (14 votes)
I would have no problem discussing a financial setback/job loss with my children.
40% (17 votes)
Total votes: 42