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5 Ridiculously Fun Games for Family Game Night

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Bring the family together for an awesomely good time, once a week or once a month, using stuff you already have in the house. For a super-fun evening, add some imagination, creativity, and curiosity to these no-cost or low-cost games.
5 Ridiculously Fun Games to Play on Family Game Night
1. Moves Like Jagger

You need: Your favorite fun music

How to play: Select a tune and start the music. Player 1 invents a move and demonstrates it for the others. Player 2 steps in, repeats the first move, and adds another. Player 3 performs the first two moves and adds a third. Continue until all players add and perform all dance moves. Polish up the act and dance together.

Tip: This game is similar to “I went on a picnic...” but with a physical component. It’s a great way to let off some steam.

2. What Not to Wear, Home Edition

You need: Old or worn-out clothing (tops, bottoms, gloves, jackets, T-shirts, sweats, hats, socks, and more); one large covered bin (optional).

How to play:

Version 1: The Free-for-All. In five minutes or less, have all players raid any drawer or closet and dress up in as many items as they collect. Vote for most clever, creative, original, or ridiculous outfit.

Version 2: Your Clothes, Your Decision. Players contribute articles of clothing from their own wardrobe—say, up to ten items. The bigger, smaller, or more outrageous the items are, the better. Place clothes in a covered bin or basket. Each player takes turn selecting an item, sight unseen, until each has ten items. (Players cannot exchange items they select.) Dress up, take pics, and post online.

Tip: Reward the worst dressed.

3. Mummy’s the Word

What you need: Toilet paper (a lot of it)

How to play: Working in pairs, one player from each team wraps his teammate in toilet paper. The first team to mummy-up wins. Allow the mummies to bust out and grab a turn wrapping their partner. Give points for the most coverage. Take pictures. Assign the title “Mummy Masters” to the winning team.

Tip: Have players sit cross-legged or belly-down on the floor to boost the challenge.

4. Draw This!

What you need: A jumbo sketch pad, plastic trash bag or bucket, pencils, markers, and assorted household items, including a lemon, pencil, cup, ruler, large pot, curly pasta, and canned tuna (feel free to add more household items)

How to play: Toss items into the bag or bucket. Select an “artist.” Have another player pull one item from the bag or bucket. The artist then draws the item based on the hints from the rest of the players—without peeking! Round 1 ends when the artist completes the drawing. The next artist takes a turn.

Tip: Everyone’s a winner. Display the art.

5. Cups, Cards, and Towers

You need: One or two decks of playing cards (depends on the number of players); one sleeve of paper drinking cups.

How to play: Distribute equal numbers of cups and cards to all participants. Round 1: Build really high towers, placing one cup over one card throughout the process. See who builds the tallest tower without their stack collapsing. Round two: Use two cards and two cups per level to increase the challenge.

Tip: Serve multilevel sandwich cookies for a snack.

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As we approach the holiday season, what’s your kids’ favorite way to communicate with Grandma and Grandpa—whether or not they live nearby?

Parents Talk Back
As we approach the holiday season, what’s your kids’ favorite way to communicate with Grandma and Grandpa—whether or not they live nearby?
In-person visits.
68% (36 votes)
Skype or FaceTime.
19% (10 votes)
Calls via cell phones or landlines.
6% (3 votes)
Handwritten cards and letters.
8% (4 votes)
Total votes: 53