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Creative
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Lid Sliders

A Game for 2 or More Players

Highlights 4Cs

Curious, Creative, Caring, and Confident™
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Curious
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Creative
The paint brush icon represents creativity. For content about raising a creative child, look for this icon.
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Caring
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Confident
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Taking turns, friendly competition, and artistic expression are the not-so-obvious lessons behind the fun when kids play the lid-slider game. It resembles a miniature version of curling (minus the brooms!), a game your kids might have seen on TV during the Olympics. The game is portable too; with lids in their pocket, kids can play anywhere: waiting for dinner in a restaurant, in a doctor’s waiting room, or on a visit to Nana’s.
Lid Sliders
What You’ll Need
  • 8 same-size jar lids
  • Acrylic paint
  • Small plastic bottle cap
What to Do

Using acrylic paints, paint four jar lids in one color and four lids in another color. Let them dry, then decorate each set of four with its own design. Let dry.

To Play

1. On a smooth surface, one player sets a plastic cap some distance from all the players.

2. Each player or team chooses a color and takes turns sliding their four lids toward the cap.

3. After all the lids have been played, the player or team with the lid closest to the cap gets 1 point. If there is a tie, both players get a point.

4. Keep playing. The first player or team to reach 5 points wins.

Extend the Fun

For younger kids: Keeping track of their own score gives kids counting and addition practice in disguise. With paper and pencil in hand, each child can tally his or her points, adding 1 + 1 + 1 + 1 + 1 to equal the winning score of 5. Children too young to play the game will be happy just painting the jar lids and decorating them in their own inimitable way.

For older kids: Expand the game into a hockey game of sorts, using a large dining table or Ping-Pong table as the playing surface, and an empty box at either end as a “net.” Then “shoot” for points.

Game by Kelly Theobald; text by Mary Sears.

Which of the following subjects do you most want your child to master?

Parents Talk Back
Which of the following subjects do you most want your child to master?
Math
41% (26 votes)
Science
22% (14 votes)
Technology
3% (2 votes)
Literature
8% (5 votes)
History
6% (4 votes)
Music and the arts
13% (8 votes)
A foreign language
8% (5 votes)
Total votes: 64