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Creative
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Writing Games

From Highlights Book of Things To Do

Highlights 4Cs

Curious, Creative, Caring, and Confident™
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Curious
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Creative
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Caring
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Confident
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Gather some friends to play these word games.
writing games

A LINE AT A TIME 

FOR 2 OR MORE PLAYERS 

One player writes a sentence and passes the paper to another player, who continues the story with a line that rhymes with the first. For example, the first player might write, “I could go for something to eat,” and the second player might write, “Do you want a meal or something sweet?” Continue taking turns until you have completed the story—or run out of rhymes. 

CHARACTER PLAY  

FOR 2 PLAYERS 

With a partner, decide on two characters from books, movies, your imagination, or the real world that could have a conversation. Maybe Harry Potter and Peter Pan, Goldilocks and Baby Bear, or a lion and a hippo who both want to drink from the same watering hole. 

One of you starts the conversation on paper, writing a sentence as one of the characters.The other player writes a response as the second character. Keep going back and forth until you have written for about 10 minutes. Then read your script out loud, with each player reading their character’s part. 

SPIN A SILLY STORY  

FOR 3 OR MORE PLAYERS 

1. Cut out at least 20 pictures from old magazines, catalogs, or newspapers. 

2. To play, turn the pictures over, so no one knows which one is which. Deal an equal number of pictures to each player. Players keep the pictures facedown in a pile.  

3. The first player flips over their top picture and begins a story by saying something related  
to it. For example, if the image is a parachute, they might say, “Last summer, I went parachuting for the first time ever. All was going well, but suddenly . . .” 

4. The second player then flips the top picture in their pile to continue the story. For example, if the picture shows a brown bear, they might say, “The wind picked up, and I was carried away. Luckily, a local bear was out for a drive in his convertible, and I landed in the passenger seat.” 

5. The next player flips a picture and uses it to continue the story.  

6. When you’re finished with one story, mix up the pictures and play again. 

1 LAST CHALLENGE! 

Write a poem or a story about an inanimate object. For example, imagine what a fork would say about being put in the dishwasher or what a sock would say after being reunited with its mate.